Roasted Romanesco Broccoli

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This is such a simple dish, but it is meaningful because many people have yet to try this vegetable. Until I tried this recipe, I had never eaten Romanesco broccoli. This beauty is a Fibonacci-esque flower, is more crunchy than cooked cauliflower, and milder in flavor than broccoli. I hope you enjoy.

Remember, eating is a journey and an adventure. Adding new vegetables in the mix can enliven a diet that has become monotonous. This is just one example of adding an interesting vegetable to my repertoire.

Clearing the Confusion About Cruciferous Vegetables

Although broccoli, cauliflower, and Romanesco are all part of the same family of vegetables, these produce items have subtle differences. Despite the fact that they all belong to the family Brassicaceae, these leafy greens vary in taste, texture, and proper preparation methods. So next time you head to the produce aisle for a healthy fix, you can select the ideal vegetable to suit your recipe.

Romanesco

Depending on the source, you may see Romanesco listed as cauliflower or broccoli. It’s light green color falls somewhere in between the two, but what truly sets it apart is it’s unmistakable texture. It’s spiky yet symmetrical Christmas tree appearance looks like an exotic flower and offers a super textural, crunchy experience. With an earthy flavor similar to broccoli, Romanesco is great raw on a crudité platter or salad, steamed, or even roasted.

Broccoli & Cauliflower

While some people think that cauliflower is nothing more than white broccoli, they are actually two entirely different vegetables. They have similar health benefits, including a high fiber content, vitamin C, folate, and beneficial phytochemicals. Broccoli also contains vitamin A, while cauliflower does not.

Cauliflower has a firmer texture than broccoli because of its tighter-packed florets. Broccolini is a hybrid of broccoli with long, tender stalks and florets.

The two can be prepared in a variety of ways. Enjoy them raw, steamed, grilled, baked in casseroles, or roasted. Cauliflower can also be steamed or boiled and mashed for a low-calorie mashed potato substitute, such as this Roasted Garlic Cauliflower Mash recipe. The key when cooking broccoli and cauliflower is to cook just until tender. No one likes overcooked broccoli mush.

Make it a Meal

Pair this Roasted Romanesco Broccoli with Sun-dried Tomato Linguine for a wholesome, delicious meal!

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Roasted Romanesco Broccoli

Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 22-25 minutes
Yield:6 servings

Ingredients

2 heads Romanesco broccoli

1/2 onion, sliced

1/4 cup capers

1 ½ teaspoons garlic powder

1 teaspoon dried oregano

olive oil

salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350o and line a sheet pan with parchment paper.
  2. Remove leaves from outside of broccoli and trim into similar sized pieces.
  3. Place broccoli, onion, and capers on the sheet pan. Season with garlic powder, oregano, salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil.
  4. Roast in oven for 22-25 minutes, or until broccoli is tender. Enjoy!

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